August 29th, 2012
sassational
What is a publisher anymore, anyway? A blog is a magazine. A magazine a blog. A newspaper a WordPress install. A Twitter account a journalist.

Craig Mod, Our New Shrines 

Here are a few tidbits from the article (his take on the PR monster, Facebook) that stood out to me, while I sat drinking my coffee, reading my emails, and pondering the evolution of macro communication and public relations:

This company with (no product and) four million fans soon to be five, soon to be ten: they decided back in 2010 to make Facebook their shrine. They spent five minutes setting up their Facebook page. Five minutes. That was their development cost. They didn’t engineer a custom CMS. They didn’t modify Django. They spent five minutes and were done and then spent three months hustling.

They hustled and found great content. For three months they hustled to develop a critical momentum in audience. They needed momentum behind their content, their brand, not momentum behind their shrine. They hustled to get their name on the maps of big bloggers, influential Twitter users. They hustled and promoted and continued to post great content not to their Tumblr site or ExpressionEngine CMS, but their Facebook page.

They have excited, eager, positive, and supporting fans. Millions, growing at a breakneck clip. Fans happy to jump toward wherever they’re pointed.

I’m sorry, but that’s creepy as fuck if you ask me.

The point of the article is to show publishers that building a community of fans is paramount to having a great product (or ANY product, even), i.e. the method of selling is changing. The way people are allowing themselves to be sold to has changed.

Duly noted. Let us also keep in mind that a lack of critical thinking is never a good idea. 

Reblogged from The FJP
August 9th, 2012
sassational
Reblogged from superfluidity
June 14th, 2012
sassational
…the habit of mind which leads
to a search for relationships
between facts becomes
of the highest importance
in the production of ideas.

A 5-Step Technique for Producing Ideas circa 1939by 

Years later, upon reissuing A Technique for Producing Ideas, Young recounted the many letters he had gotten from “poets, painters, engineers, scientists, and even one writer of legal briefs” who had found his technique empowering and helpful. But what’s perhaps most interesting is the following note he made to the postscript of a reprint:

From my own further experience in advertising, government, and public affairs I find no essential points which I would modify in the idea-producing process. There is one, however, on which I would put greater emphasis. This is as to the store of general materials in the idea-producer’s reservoir.

[…]

I am convinced, however, that you gather this vicarious experience best, not when you are boning up on it for an immediate purpose, but when you are pursuing it as an end in itself.

June 5th, 2012
sassational
May 2nd, 2012
sassational
Cybernetics is the study of systems and processes that interact with themselves and produce themselves from themselves.

A (somewhat) recent definition of cybernetics, as proposed by Louis Kauffman, President of the American Society for Cybernetics at the CYBCON discussion group, September 2007. [Source]

(Source: sassational)

April 21st, 2012
sassational

Riccardo Guasco:

Master And The Line (Sketchbook With My Chinese Brush)

Riccardo Guasco on Tumblr

Reblogged from
November 11th, 2011
sassational
Fun With Alphabetic Anthropomorphisms!
(or, playing with letters and pictures)

Children who enjoy tinkering with words as Max does may end up in the realm of anagrams, palindromes, word squares and other ways of “making the alphabet dance,” to quote the title of one wordplay anthology. Letters need not be mere vehicles for literacy, as these books demonstrate. They can be the very stuff of creativity, rooted in the age-old impulse to make the alphabet our plaything.
Ben Zimmer, former On Language columnist for The Times Magazine, is the executive producer of VisualThesaurus.com and Vocabulary.com.

This is a great article, I encourage you to read the entire version here as he mentions several creative children’s books that use the alphabet to open the imagination. I recall one of my favorite books as a child - a children’s dictionary (anyone who knows me is not surprised by this) - but the best part was that the intro section for each letter of the alphabet was made into a large infographic showing the letter’s use and development through history. I would looooove to find that one again. (I’ve looked for years but have yet to locate a copy).  

Fun With Alphabetic Anthropomorphisms!

(or, playing with letters and pictures)

Children who enjoy tinkering with words as Max does may end up in the realm of anagrams, palindromes, word squares and other ways of “making the alphabet dance,” to quote the title of one wordplay anthology. Letters need not be mere vehicles for literacy, as these books demonstrate. They can be the very stuff of creativity, rooted in the age-old impulse to make the alphabet our plaything.

This is a great article, I encourage you to read the entire version here as he mentions several creative children’s books that use the alphabet to open the imagination. I recall one of my favorite books as a child - a children’s dictionary (anyone who knows me is not surprised by this) - but the best part was that the intro section for each letter of the alphabet was made into a large infographic showing the letter’s use and development through history. I would looooove to find that one again. (I’ve looked for years but have yet to locate a copy).  

(Source: sassational)

May 18th, 2011
sassational
Reblogged from FUCK YEAH LANGUAGE
April 18th, 2011
sassational
The Einstein You Never Knew

As a child, Einstein did not begin talking until he was fully 3 years old — a fact so contrary to the conventional wisdom about smart kids and language skills that the writer Thomas Sowell titled a book on the topic “The Einstein Syndrome: Bright Children Who Talk Late.” 

 
No human being has ever been so readily identified with the notion of pure genius as Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955). In 1905 alone (commonly referred to as his Annus mirabilis, or “year of wonder”), the 26-year-old patent-office clerk published three groundbreaking scientific papers — including one that included the most famous equation ever formulated, E = mc2, which showed that massive amounts of energy could be derived from very little mass and, ultimately, ushered in the nuclear age. But Einstein was hardly a one-dimensional thinking machine; in fact, his was a life filled with idiosyncracies, riddles, contradictions, and plain old goofy trivia. 
Remembering Albert Einstein: March 14, 1879 - April 18, 1955 
(Source: life)

The Einstein You Never Knew

As a child, Einstein did not begin talking until he was fully 3 years old — a fact so contrary to the conventional wisdom about smart kids and language skills that the writer Thomas Sowell titled a book on the topic “The Einstein Syndrome: Bright Children Who Talk Late.” 

No human being has ever been so readily identified with the notion of pure genius as Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955). In 1905 alone (commonly referred to as his Annus mirabilis, or “year of wonder”), the 26-year-old patent-office clerk published three groundbreaking scientific papers — including one that included the most famous equation ever formulated, E = mc2, which showed that massive amounts of energy could be derived from very little mass and, ultimately, ushered in the nuclear age. But Einstein was hardly a one-dimensional thinking machine; in fact, his was a life filled with idiosyncracies, riddles, contradictions, and plain old goofy trivia. 

Remembering Albert Einstein: March 14, 1879 - April 18, 1955 

(Source: life)

April 4th, 2011
sassational

What’s in a word? Quite a lot, actually.

Andy Budd on Ethics and Terminology: “There are undoubtedly good people in the [SEO] industry, just as there are good people in the banking world. In fact I’d say that the majority of practitioners fall into this category. I just struggle to accept an industry which exists in the same continuum as blog spammers and which is forced to label its members as “white hat” and “black hat”. After all we don’t talk about “black hat” doctors, “black hat” hairdressers or “black hat” designers. So by using these terms, the industry is knowingly complicit in the problem. In fact there exists an almost adolescent glee that they are involved in something slightly naughty.”

Andy Budd::Blogography (via 2105)

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(=`ェ´=) Cat person who is into other stuff too, but really it's mostly cats. Probably.
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