February 7th, 2014
sassational

PHOTOGRAPHY: Both Sides Of by Alex John Beck

Symmetrical faces are said to be a benchmark for true beauty (this especially rings true in the fashion industry), but this startling project shows they actually might not be what everyone wants.

Artist British-born, New York-based photographer Alex John Beck’s series ‘Both Sides Of’ offers two sets of symmetrical faces. One image takes the left half of the subject’s face and mirrors it into the beauty shot of a seemingly whole face, while the adjacent portrait offers a similarly symmetrical rendition of the right side of the face.

Read More at wetheurban

Whoa, fascinating.

Reblogged from WeTheUrban
February 6th, 2014
sassational

Powerful Photos of Vanishing Indigenous People Across The Globe

The Goroka, Papua New Guinea. © Jimmy Nelson BV Courtesy teNeues.

Putting aside a successful career, British photographer Jimmy Nelson embarked on a treacherous, lengthy journey to document the last remaining indigenous people of the world. From the thick, wet Amazon rain forests of Ecuador to the frigid tundras of Siberia, Nelson sought out and spent significant time with each native culture, grasping a genuine understanding of their lives and traditions. Shot with a 50-year-old plate film camera, Before They Pass Away is a poignant chronicle of heritage and humanity that threatens to be lost forever. His energy an absolute contagious source of inspiration, we recently spoke with Nelson about his life and work.

The Asaro, Papua New Guinea. © Jimmy Nelson BV Courtesy teNeues.

The Artist:

“If we could start a global movement that documents and shares images, thoughts and stories about tribal life both old and new, perhaps we could save part of our world’s precious cultural heritage from vanishing. We must work to let them coexist in these modern times by supporting their cause, respecting their habitats, recording their pride, and helping them to pass on their traditions to generations to come.

“I want to show these tribes that they are already rich, that they have something that money can’t buy. I would like to demonstrate to them that the Western modern society is not as pure and inspiring as their own culture and values and therefore it is not something to necessarily aspire to.

“Even though I am aware that my photographic document will not be able to prevent the eventual disappearance of the tribes, I strongly hope that it adds to the realization that by respecting their natural habitat and way of life, we are able to stretch it as long as possible. I strive to create a visual document that reminds us, and the generations after us, of the beauty of pure and honest living.”

The Mursi, Ethiopia. © Jimmy Nelson BV Courtesy teNeues.

“There is one particular story of a tough moment for me as a photographer. There is a photo of three native Kazakh men from Mongolia with eagles on their shoulders on a mountain. That picture took three days to make, because each morning there wasn’t enough light. On the fourth morning, it was about minus 20 degrees on top of the mountain and the light was beautiful. I took off my gloves to take the photo and they literally froze to the camera.

“I began crying and when I turned my head I saw that two women had followed us to the top of the mountain. One of them took my fingers and cradled them in her jacket until I got the feeling back and was able to take a couple of photographs. What I didn’t know was that these women are actually strict Sunni Muslims, and broke all codes of modesty in order to aid me. They had noticed my desperation and did what they could to help me achieve what I was there for.”

The Kazakh, Mongolia. © Jimmy Nelson BV Courtesy teNeues.

The Rabari, India. © Jimmy Nelson BV Courtesy teNeues.

The Maori, New Zealand. © Jimmy Nelson BV Courtesy teNeues.

The Chukchi, Serbia. © Jimmy Nelson BV Courtesy teNeues.

The Ladakhi, India. © Jimmy Nelson BV Courtesy teNeues.

Gauchos, Argentina. © Jimmy Nelson BV Courtesy teNeues.

The Kalam, Papua New Guinea. © Jimmy Nelson BV Courtesy teNeues.

The Himba, Namibia. © Jimmy Nelson BV Courtesy teNeues.

The Huli, Papua New Guinea. © Jimmy Nelson BV Courtesy teNeues.

The Huaorani, Ecuador. © Jimmy Nelson BV Courtesy teNeues.

The Vanuatu, Vanuatu Islands. © Jimmy Nelson BV Courtesy teNeues.

Article via www.featureshoot.com

November 26th, 2012
sassational
Self Portrait In The Hallway

2007

I was looking for pictures of short hair to show my stylist before my next trim, and came across this pic I took of myself in January of 2007. I recall taking the picture because I was quite proud of myself for getting the tie done properly, and wanted proof of it because I wasn’t sure I’d ever be able to make that happen again.  I wish I could find those earrings, loved those. 

Self Portrait In The Hallway

2007

I was looking for pictures of short hair to show my stylist before my next trim, and came across this pic I took of myself in January of 2007. I recall taking the picture because I was quite proud of myself for getting the tie done properly, and wanted proof of it because I wasn’t sure I’d ever be able to make that happen again.  I wish I could find those earrings, loved those. 

August 1st, 2012
sassational

Tree Hotel | Harads, Sweden

Tham & Videgård Arkitekter's treehouse-inspired project has been voted to be one of five category finalists for the Archdaily’s 2011 Building of the Year Award.

February 22, 2012
ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards Finalist: Tree Hotel

A tree hotel in the far north of Sweden, near the small village of Harads, close to the Arctic Circle. A shelter up in the trees; a lightweight aluminium structure hung around a tree trunk, a 4×4x4 meters box clad in mirrored glass. The exterior reflects the surroundings and the sky, creating a camouflaged refuge. The interior is all made of plywood and the windows give a 360 degree view of the surroundings.  

To prevent birds colliding with the reflective glass, a transparent ultraviolet colour is laminated into the glass panes which are visible for birds only.  

The construction also alludes to how man relates to nature, how we use high tech materials and products when exploring remote places in harsh climates (Gore-tex, Kevlar, composite materials, light weight tents etc).

The functions included provide for a living for two people; a double bed, a small bath room, a living room and a roof terrace. Access to the cabin is by a rope bridge connected to the next tree.

Source: alecschao, ArchDaily

Whoa, fancy. I was immediately concerned about birds crashing into it, but then read the blurb about a transparent ultraviolet colour that’s laminated into the glass panes (only visible to birds). Ok, ok …sounds good. I wonder how expensive or sustainable the lamination is, or if it’s visible to other flying creatures who aren’t avian, such at bats.

Just curious. Poor bats. 

Otherwise, I’d sleep there for sure! Except for that one with no wall on the side, you can have that one. *smiles sweetly*  

July 23rd, 2012
sassational
Maya Angelou, The Art of Fiction No. 119: 

“Most people don’t grow up. It’s too damn difficult. What happens is most people get older. That’s the truth of it. They honor their credit cards, they find parking spaces, they marry, they have the nerve to have children, but they don’t grow up. Not really. They get older. But to grow up costs the earth, the earth. It means you take responsibility for the time you take up, for the space you occupy. It’s serious business. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth. Not superficial costs—anybody can have that—I mean in truth. That’s what I write. What it really is like. I’m just telling a very simple story.”  (Source: theparisreview)

This is why I love being around children: they’re constantly growing up, and learning. Seems like many adults are doing just the opposite, you know? 

Maya Angelou, The Art of Fiction No. 119

“Most people don’t grow up. It’s too damn difficult. What happens is most people get older. That’s the truth of it. They honor their credit cards, they find parking spaces, they marry, they have the nerve to have children, but they don’t grow up. Not really. They get older. But to grow up costs the earth, the earth. It means you take responsibility for the time you take up, for the space you occupy. It’s serious business. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth. Not superficial costs—anybody can have that—I mean in truth. That’s what I write. What it really is like. I’m just telling a very simple story.”  (Source: theparisreview)

This is why I love being around children: they’re constantly growing up, and learning. Seems like many adults are doing just the opposite, you know? 

Reblogged from The Paris Review
July 20th, 2012
sassational

Vintage Images, Lost & Found: Gordon Parks’ Powerful “Segregation Series” 

Recently The Gordon Parks Foundation discovered over 70 unpublished photographs by Parks at the bottom of an old storage box wrapped in paper and marked as “Segregation Series.” These never before series of images not only give us a glimpse into the everyday life of African Americans during the 50′s but are also in full color, something that is uncommon for photographs from that era. (Source: reginasworld)

Sometimes consideration for the future requires a long, hard look at the past. Mistakes are not to be forgotten and packed away, they should be recorded, studied and learned from.

Reblogged from
July 2nd, 2012
sassational

Gerd Ludwig’s “Long Shadow of Chernobyl” project

Internationally-renowned photojournalist Gerd Ludwig has spent years documenting the aftermath of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. In 1986, errors at the plant in Ukraine led to an explosion that ultimately caused over a quarter of a million people to permanently evacuate their homes to escape the radiation and radioactive fallout. Over the course of several trips to the site and the region for National Geographic Magazine in 1993, 2005, and 2011, Ludwig has amassed a documentary record of a people and a place irreparably altered by a tragic accident. His 2011 trip was partially funded by a Kickstarter campaign. Now Ludwig has released an iPad app with over 150 photographs, video, and interactive panoramas. (via kqedscience)

Oh hey what whoa. Startling, huh? I found the evidence of so much color to be a stark contrast to what I thought I knew about the site. The images, combined with a teensy bit of hindsight and passable knowledge of history that followed, allow some insight into the state of affairs at the time of the unfortunate blast. Also, blasted dolls are way fucking creepy.

Reblogged from crooked indifference
January 19th, 2012
sassational

The Love Story
That Changed History

Fascinating photographs of interracial marriage at a time
when it was banned in 16 states

[Fom DailyMailUK] Just 45 years ago, 16 states deemed marriages between two people of different races illegal. But in 1967, the U.S. Supreme Court considered the case of Richard Perry Loving, who was white, and his wife, Mildred Loving, of African American and Native American descent.

The case changed history - and was captured on film by LIFE photographer Grey Villet, whose black-and-white photographs are now set to go on display at the International Center of Photography.

Twenty images show the tenderness and family support enjoyed by Mildred and Richard and their three children, Peggy, Sidney and Donald.

The children, unaware of the struggles their parents face, are captured by Villet as blissfully happy as they play in the fields near their Virginia home or share secrets with their parents on the couch.

Their parents, caught sharing a kiss on their front porch, appear more worry-stricken.

And it is no wonder - eight years prior, the pair had married in the District of Columbia to evade the Racial Integrity Act of 1924, which banned any white person marrying any non-white person.

But when they returned to Virginia, police stormed into their room in the middle of the night and they were arrested.

The pair were found guilty of miscegenation in 1959 and were each sentenced to one year in prison, suspended for 25 years if they left Virginia.

They moved back to the District of Columbia, where they began the long legal battle to erase their criminal records - and justify their relationship.

Following vocal support from the Presbyterian and Roman Catholic churches, the Lovings won the fight - with the Supreme Court branding Virginia’s anti-miscegenation law unconstitutional in 1967.

It wrote in its decision:

‘Marriage is one of the basic civil rights of man, fundamental to our very existence and survival.

‘To deny this fundamental freedom on so unsupportable a basis as the racial classifications embodied in these statutes, classifications so directly subversive of the principle of equality at the heart of the Fourteenth Amendment, is surely to deprive all the State’s citizens of liberty without due process of law.’

[Read more

(Source: blackndns)

January 10th, 2012
sassational

Shoes of the Very Famous

Robert Frank’s Red-and-Yellow Brogues, Circa 1974-1975

For all you photo nerds out there…

The groundbreaking Swiss-born photographer Robert Frank spent two years crisscrossing the United States, photographing all strata of society. In all, he shot some 28,000 frames. The result was his 1958 magnum opus called The Americans, a searing look at the contradictions of life in the U.S. Frank accidentally left these shoes at the Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester, N.Y., while working with film students in the mid-1970s.

See more: Shoes of the Very Famous

Reblogged from LIFE
January 5th, 2012
sassational

Horse training for the militia, Mongolia, 1979

by Eve Arnold (1912-2012)

Reblogged from kateoplis
December 27th, 2011
sassational

The Badass of the Day is Pilot Trainee Shirley Slade [1943]…

…as she sits on the wing of her Army trainer at Avenger Field in Sweetwater, Texas. In September of that year, Slade graduated as part of the Women Airforce Service Pilots Class 43-5 (also known as WASPs). 

Far from passive witnesses to — or victims of — the fighting in World War II, women took an active role in the war effort from the very start of the conflict. (see more WWII: Women in the Fight)

Reblogged from LIFE
October 28th, 2011
sassational

My new-to-me artist of the day

is Heinz Maier, of Germany.

German photographer Heinz Maier says that he began taking photographs less than a year ago in late 2010. He claims to not know what direction he’s heading in just yet, right now he’s experimenting with macro photography, mostly insects, animals, and these delicate high speed water droplets. Personally, I think he’s found a great direction. There are so many things happening here to make these photographs simply outstanding: the lighting, the colors, the occasional use of symmetry in the reflection of water, let alone the skill of knowing how to use the camera itself. It’s hard to believe these aren’t digital. See much more of his work here.

Reblogged from muted_posthorn
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Sassational is the weblog repository of Andrea (Pegg) Eaken, aka "Sassy". Find me on Twitter, @_WordGirl or Instagram, Sassational. It's
fun being Creative Director
for Kinetic Consulting, too
(but the views expressed
here are wholly my own and are not those of my employer, cool?).

Somewhat Interesting Tidbits:
I am a gutsy critical thinker,
a passionate dance and yoga lover, exuberant (but not always successful) reverse-engineer in the kitchen, wifey to the magically delishous Mister @kid_ish, and proud Mom to my kiddo and
two kickass ocicats.

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